Another Example of Goedel’s proof

rogersgeorge on June 19th, 2017

Okay, I’m being lazy; this is an easy post. I do have some good stuff in the saddlebag, though.

A while back (actually last May) I wrote about Goedel’s proof, about how he proved that it’s impossible to have a completely consistent set of rules about anything. If you skipped the post, you should go read it. It’s not exactly about writing, it’s about a fact of life: We’ll never figure things out completely because contradictions always exist.

So here’s proof. Is this Break of Day comic logical or not?

Answer: Yes, it’s logical, but it’s also contradictory.

PS. I can’t help making a writing comment: It should be “…petition to help stop us.”

Subscribe to this blog's RSS feed

Why you need a Proofreader

rogersgeorge on June 16th, 2017

I saw a version of this back in the 1960’s in Readers Digest. http://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2017/06/12

Continue Reading...

Denominatives and Verbal Nouns

rogersgeorge on June 14th, 2017

I mentioned this topic twice before over the years (here and here), but not with the actual names. So here’s an appropriate Calvin and Hobbes comic, and my definitions afterwards. When you make a verb out of a noun, we call the word a denominative. For example, chair. When you make a noun out of […]

Continue Reading...

Anthropomorphism in Technical Writing

rogersgeorge on June 12th, 2017

A while back I wrote a series of posts on figures of speech. Figures of speech are ways of playing fast and loose with the language, on purpose, and managing to be understood when you do so. Someone (Hi, Sara) asked me to write about anthropomorphism, a figure of speech you don’t generally find in […]

Continue Reading...

Grammar Nazi gets it Wrong!

rogersgeorge on June 10th, 2017

Okay, sometimes those dogmatic folks who correct your English unasked get it wrong! Jump Start is a Case in point: She makes three points, and two are wrong. Split infinitive. Not putting an adverb between the “to” and the rest of the verb is a hold-over from Latin, promulgated by stuffy English teachers. English has been splitting […]

Continue Reading...