Buzzwords, Jargon, and Portmanteaus

rogersgeorge on May 30th, 2017

Okay, my previous post is out of order. I mentioned a “previous post” about portmanteau words, but it was a post whose material was in my saddlebag—I hadn’t posted it yet! So here’s that material:

A definition is in order: jargon is language that fits into a narrow field and might be unknown elsewhere. Jargon doesn’t need to consist of portmanteau words, but lots of times it happens. Here’s the Fastrack comic that got me started on this topic:

The comments on the site are pretty good, too. Some of these are portmanteaus, and some are just plain jargon. Jargon that gets overused are buzzwords, by the way.

And while I’m on the subject, the excellent daily wordsmith.org  blog A Word A Day is mentioning portmanteaus this week (starting May 29, 2017). Go look. Subscribe!

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Portmanteau Words

rogersgeorge on May 22nd, 2017

Seems to me I mentioned these guys recently, but I’m too lazy to do a big search for my post about them (I think it was a post about buzzwords). Besides, this Dagwood oops Blondie comic is a good example of these words.

A portmanteau is an old kind of suitcase, usually made of leather, and usually with some kind of straps. You put unrelated things inside, hence the analogy with portmanteau words, parts of unrelated words put together into one word.

Blondie - 05/16/2017

“Ever-popular” is just a plain old compound adjective.

Enormity

rogersgeorge on May 20th, 2017

I mentioned enormity a while back, as a word that most people get wrong. Here’s someone who gets it correct!

In case you didn’t see that earlier post, “enormity” means extremely bad, not extremely big.

And here’s a more serious example of getting enormity right. It’s from This Day in History for May 11.

Still, many in the crowd did not realize the enormity of the disaster. Some young fans reportedly danced and sang in front of the raging fire while others threw stones at a television crew.

 

Gender-Neutral Pronouns

rogersgeorge on May 14th, 2017

Really concise today…

Mallard Fillmore - 04/29/2017

https://comicskingdom.com/mallard-fillmore/2017-04-29  Bruce Tinsley

My solution is to avoid pronouns. Pronouns are an easy source of accidental ambiguity. The singular “they” goes back to Milton or Chaucer, so the duck can’t really object to the usage.

We have no gender neutral singular pronouns in English–you can’t have a group of a singular, but in our current culture, it’s less in style to be so specific, although sometimes you don’t know the gender. Sex, btw is the biological term, gender is grammar, though our culture has started using gender to refer to sexual preferences.

As Promised, Something Light

rogersgeorge on May 6th, 2017

Perhaps the dirtiest joke I’ve allowed on this site. Darrin Bell’s Candorville begins with “ain’t,” which is bad, and ends with a figure of speech called an “allusion.” (Hey I gotta put some grammar in here somehow…)