Counting to Two

rogersgeorge on December 28th, 2017

Some words imply two of something. “Pair,” and “second,” for example. And we say “lesser of two evils.” You can be between two things, but if you you have more than two, you are among them.

A few other words imply two-ness and sometimes we get them wrong. Here’s an example:

Some puzzles require a mind for math, others a keen eye. Then there are brainteasers that are so nonsensical the biggest challenge is saying them with a straight face. The “cows and chickens” riddle falls into the latter group.

That next-to-last word should be “last.” “Latter” means “second of two,” and he’s got three types of riddle here.

The rule: count both your blessings only if you have two of them, and use the right word when you do have exactly two of something.

PS—”nonsensical” should have a comma after it.

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